NBT Table Of Contents -- General Rules

Last Updated: 18 Aug 2017
  1. Introduction

    An Introduction To NBT: The NetBattleTech League System

    NBT is one of the oldest planetary resource leagues in existence. It has evolved through several incarnations, starting in the mid-1990’s with Activision’s Mechwarrior2: Mercenaries; continued through Microsoft’s Mechwarrior 4: Vengeance, Black Knight & Mercenaries editions; flourished with the Hardcore and MekTek community mods to the MW4 engine; and is reborn for Pirhana Games Inc's Mechwarrior:Online and Harebrained Scheme's Battletech titles.
    What exactly is a "planetary" league? In a "planetary" league, teams battle for control over a map of one or more galaxies. In the context of the Battletech Universe, there is one galaxy (ours), set in a particular timeline. Groups of planets are owned by factions, who are responsible for planning for their defense, and, optionally, expanding their empire by attacking other factions. Attacks and defends are subject to the resources a faction has available to them; in a Mechwarrior-based league, those resources would be mechs; in a league that supports a deeper set of combat units, the types of resources would expand to include all types of combat units supported by the particular game.
    In order to obtain the resources necessary to prosecute attacks and execute defenses, a faction must purchase the combat units (and means of transport required to move them around the galaxy(s)) -- this introduces the concept of an economy. And where an economy can thrive, it can also be disrupted, to the detriment of factions who may have been planning on a certain level of economic output to implement their offensive and defensive strategies. Optionally, a faction may decide simply to take what they need from their neighbors. Of course, those neighbors are not likely just to give the aggressor what they want, so the matter must be settled via combat.
    The NBT League System supports all manner of peaceful and forceful exchange of resources and assets (planets); a faction can purchse the combat units it needs from its own factories (or the factories of its allies), using the economic output of its own planets; it can raid enemies and endeavour to steal their resources (combat units, economic assets, and so on); it can launch full-scale assaults on enemy space in an attempt to take control of the enemy planets and the assets on those planets.
    Any action that results in combat is decided in the game or simulator associated with the league. In a Mechwarrior:Online-based league, those battles are fought in the MWO game client. In a Battletech-based league, the outcome of the action is decided in the Battletech game client. In this way, the NBT League System can be thought to provide a "strategic meta-game" around the actual game involved, providing a depth to the game experience not possible just by playing the game itself. NBT can "give meaning" to playing the game, in other words.
    With all of the above in mind, NBT can most accurately be described as a "resource-based planetary league". One of the key differences between NBT and more straightforward tournament-style leagues, is that "resources matter". When attacking or defending, a faction may only use what combat resources ('Mechs, etc.) it has available on the planet(s) or dropship(s) involved. For example, if attacked and the defender has only, say, Battlemaster and Raven mechs on the target planet, they may only use Battlemasters and Ravens in the planet's defense. Much of the depth offered by NBT involves the level of planning involved in making sure that the most valuable planets are properly defended, or attacks prosecuted with the equipment necessary for best chance of success.
    Additional depth is provided by the ability to affect the strategies of your opponents. For example, a faction may launch a series of raids designed to cripple an opponent's ability to resupply their defenses, in the preparatory phase of a broader plan to assault the opponent's space...or perhaps simply to ease pressure by the opponent on a faction allied with the attacker. The reasons for any action in an NBT League are bounded only by the cunning of the team controlling the faction. In many ways, the NBT meta-game resembles a classic strategy game such as chess, in that not every action may be what it seems and motives are often hidden until the strategy plays itself out.
    NBT also distinguishes itself from tournament-style leagues in that role-play is a central aspect of the league; when a team accepts control of a faction in an NBT league, they are expected (in some cases, required) to role-play their faction to the best of their ability. This does not mean following canon to the letter; in fact, NBT encourages whatever departure from canon a team wishes, to the extent that the departure is roleplayed as well. NBT proudly creates its own history in the BattleTech Universe.
    In short, as long as there is a multiplayer Battletech-based game that can benefit from the additional depth of experience that NBT provides, NBT will be there to provide it!
  2. Ground Rules
    Welcome to NBT! If you are reading this, it is probably because you are interested in joining NBT. For a brief explanation of what NBT offers to the player of a BattleTech-based game, you may first want to review the NBT Overview. When finished (or if you are already familiar with NBT), the basic rules for participation in NBT follow.
    Do I need to be on a team to play in NBT? Whether an NBT league instance is team- or individual-based depends on the underlying game. For example, a multi-player Mechwarrior-based league will be strictly team-based (no solo or lone-wolf pilots are supported). However, a player-vs-player turn-based game such as Battletech or MegaMek is inherently single-player by design, and as such, an NBT league based on these games would support individual ownership and control of factions (although the team-based architecture of NBT faction control would allow multiple players to play out battles on behalf of the faction).

    NBT Code Of Conduct

    The following base set of rules apply to all players in all NBT leagues, regardless of rank, popularity, success, etc. No one is above these rules and verified violation of these rules will result in immediate punitive action by league administration once brought to their attention. The primary goal of NBT is to have fun playing the game, and violation of each of the following runs counter to that goal. One way to view these rules, is that they are expected of any adult in civil society; a certain level of maturity is required and expected from participants in an NBT league.
    • The Rules: You will not taunt or otherwise encourage other players to violate any NBT or game rules. You will not allow another player to taunt you into violating any NBT or game rules. NBT Rules are to be upheld at all times, by all members.
    • Cheating: Cheating in ALL forms is strictly forbidden. In the game, in the automation, in comms, wherever it may occur. Any player found intentionally cheating will be banned from all NBT leagues. This includes exploiting any bugs in the game itself to obtain an unfair advantage over your opponents. If you have a question about whether or not a particular game mechanic is a bug, ask your league administration; they will make a binding ruling and update the public rules accordingly.
    • Accusations Of Cheating: Should you feel that someone is cheating, you MUST have proof. This is the day and age of pervasive streaming and the ability easily to record your matches in full; there is no reason not to have conclusive proof of suspicious activity. You should also understand that the accused will have a chance to offer evidence (likely video, from their perspective) to counter the accusation, and all available evidence will be considered by league administration. Once you have conclusive evidence, you will contact NBT Administration with same; accusations of cheating will NOT be prosecuted in public, which means no posting same in any forums, mailing lists, chat clients, in-game, anywhere. NBT Administration will then make a determination on the nature of the proof, and what action will be taken -- if any. Understand that accusations of cheating, as much as they damage the enjoyment of the game for the victim, can also irreparably damage the reputation of the accused if they are false or in any way fabricated. Therefore, the decisions of NBT Administration are final on the accusation leveled. The presence of any such decision (regardless in whose favor the decision swings) does not lift the prohibition on prosecuting the accusation in public; given the serious nature of accusations of cheating, violating this rule will result in sanctions as swiftly as any levied against the alleged cheater. In short, don't do it.
    • Cursing & Offensive Remarks: You may not use any offensive, sexually explicit, harmful, threatening, abusive, harassing, defamatory, vulgar, obscene, hateful, racially, ethnically or otherwise objectionable remarks. Understand that some terms that are commonly accepted in certain cultures, regions or nations may not be acceptable in others, so be cautious in public text or voice communications. You will not use partial masking in order to use inappropriate words that would otherwise be in violation of the rules. [Note: If we can tell what word you are trying to mask, and the word is in violation of the rules, then the partially masked word is in violation of the rules. Hint: Try using cartoon speak when you really want to say something potentially offensive. "I am &^%^$% lost!" is an example of complete masking and is acceptable.]
    • Gloating, Taunting, Whining & Pouting: This is a game; in each match and drop, one player or team will win, the other will lose. Winners are supposed to be proud of their accomplishments, but not to the detriment of the members and morale of the opponent. On the other hand, when a battle is lost there is no excuse for stalking off or sulking as a result. Learn from your mistakes and move on. Let the other team know it was a "Good Game" and continue playing (even if it was not; the essential niceties must be observed). Basically this comes down to a certain level of maturity on the part of the members of the league. Win with class, lose with dignity. Note that there is a difference (subtle, but there) between friendly trash-talking and griefing; as always, NBT Administration will have the final say on whether or not an exchange crosses the line. Basically, err on the side of saying nothing; if it doesn't need to be said, don't say it -- always assume that someone will have a screenshot, video, or audio recording of what you said and NBT Administration will make a decision solely on that basis.
    • Attitudes & Egos: These will not be tolerated in NBT. Each of us is here to have fun. People with massive egos, chips on their shoulders, or just bad attitudes are a waste of the NBT Administrators' time as well as that of other teams. If you are not here to have fun, and allow others to do the same, you are in the wrong place, and need to move on. Judgement on the toxicity of any given player or team is solely at the discretion of NBT Administration.
    • Legal: You may not violate any local, state, national or international law or regulation while playing in an NBT-related match or drop. You may not use the game or league services to engage in illegal activity. You may not arrange for the exchange or transfer of any pirated software or other contraband while you are in the NBT automation or through the NBT website or forums. You may not use the NBT website for activities other than activities permitted in the game universe or events associated with NBT.
    • Rules Lawyering: Your idea of fun may be trying to nitpick every possible violation of the NBT League Rules by your opponents. That is not NBT Administration's idea of fun. Rules lawyers are boring; don't be one. Consider infractions on the basis of their severity and intent and make sure you want to bring them to the attention of NBT Administration. If you are a player who habitually brings up violations of any severity or intent, NBT Administration will quickly tune you out. In other words, make sure the infraction actually matters.
  3. Factions
    NBT leagues typically are organized by faction; it is the faction that owns and controls resources and planets on the league starmap. For NBT leagues involving naturally team-based games, we do not plan any solo or lone-wolf activities or competitions at this time. This mean that in order to participate in NBT, you must belong to team that controls a faction in the league.

    Faction Rosters

    Teams members are generally lumped into two broad categories -- Leader and Member. A team can have any number of members it likes, and can edit their roster as often as they like, with two restrictions:
    1. No pilot can be on the roster for two factions at the same time in any given league.
    2. In order for a pilot to be "legal" for a league drop, they must be on the roster no less than one hour prior to the scheduled drop
    Pilot names are required to match the in-game name of the pilot exactly, including any spaces, odd characters and/or symbols, and capitalization. This is necessary for disambiguation, and it also enhances the ability for "auto-reporting" of league drop results with games that support such data transfer. Some games have direct support for additional identifying information, such as in-game unit or clan tags; these are not included in the pilot names listed on a faction's roster.
    Pilots are not required to register for the league automation to participate in league play. Pilots are encouraged to do so, however; registering in the league automation allows pilots to be more aware of what is happening in the league, with their team/faction, and so on. You will have the opportunity to review the NBT Privacy Policy and our Terms of Service (including how we share your data -- put simply, we don't) prior to submitting your registration.

    Faction Types

    NetBattleTech provides a league experience based on the BattleTech Universe (BTU). As such, all factions in any NBT league are one of the types listed below. Note: not all factions will be available in all NBT leagues; which factions are available (and what their common names are) depends on the league timeline, and the design of the league by the league administrator.

    Major Inner Sphere House

    These factions form the backbone of any NBT league. They control the most space on the map and typically are controlled by the most reliable teams. NBT Administration will exercise the most due diligence and deliberation in assigning applicants to Inner Sphere Houses.
    Following is the complete list of Major Inner Sphere House factions (in alphabetical order):
    • House Davion (e.g., Federated Suns)
    • House Kurita (e.g. Draconis Combine)
    • House Liao (e.g., Capellan Confederation)
    • House Marik (e.g., Free Worlds League)
    • House Steiner (e.g., Lyran Alliance)
    You may wonder why Free Rasalhague Republic and St. Ives Compact are not on this list, even though they comprise significant portions of any Clan-invasion-era Inner Sphere map. Both are essentially breakaway factions of the larger Houses, where the list above (minus Terran Hegemony) are founding members of the Star League, on which much of the lore of BTU is based.
    The distinction actually has meaning in terms of launching any NBT league; any Inner Sphere faction tagged as a "Major House" must be filled and active before any NBT league will start. The list of Major Houses for a given NBT league may deviate from the list above, for that particular league, solely at the discretion of the league designer and administration.

    Major Clan

    In a timeline where these factions exist, they augment the backbone of their NBT league (along with the major houses). Given the nature of the Clan invasion in BTU, these factions typically already occupy part of the Inner Sphere (although whether or not an invasion exists is up to the designer and administrator of that particular league). Given the canonical significance of these factions, control of them will be given as much consideration by NBT Administration as is given the Major Houses.
    Following is the complete list of Major Clan factions (in alphabetical order):
    • Clan Diamond Shark*
    • Clan Ghost Bear
    • Clan Jade Falcon
    • Clan Nova Cat*
    • Clan Smoke Jaguar*
    • Clan Steel Viper*
    • Clan Wolf
    * depending on league timeline
    Clan factions may or may not be tagged as "required" for NBT league start, at the sole discretion of the league designer and administration. Similarly, the list of "Major Clan" factions is on a per-league basis and is at the sole discretion of the league designer and administration.

    Minor Clans

    These Clan factions may be present in post-Invasion-timeline leagues and are typically restricted to the Clan homeworlds. They are not prohibited from interacting with Inner Sphere factions but generally will concentrate on intra-Clan activity in the Kerensky Cluster. Some examples of Minor Clan factions (including, but not limited to):
    • Clan Cloud Cobra
    • Clan Coyote
    • Clan Star Adder
    • Clan Widowmaker
    • Clan Fire Mandrill
    • Clan Blood Spirit

    Periphery Kingdoms

    These factions are smaller than their Inner Sphere Major House neighbors, and exist on the "periphery" of the Inner Sphere map. These factions are fiercely independent and generally distrustful of Star League factions in general. In terms of activity level in a given NBT league, these factions usually see a lower level of activity than Inner Sphere houses. Inclusion of any periphery faction is subject to the discretion of a given NBT league designer or administrator, and often will depend on the timeline of the league. Periphery faction examples include (but are not limited to):
    • Magistracy Of Canopus (House Centrella)
    • Taurian Concordat (House Calderon)
    • Outworlds Alliance (House Avellar)
    • Marian Hegemony (House O'Reilly)
    • Oberon Confederation (House Grimm)

    Mercenaries

    As their name suggests, Mercenary factions operate as "guns for hire", providing their services to the highest bidder and with few exceptions, loyal only to the c-bill. Mercenaries generally work only for Inner Sphere Houses and periphery kingdoms, typically augmenting forces in employer actions and occasionally acting on their own, but generally always under contract.
    Opening of Mercenary factions for application is at the sole discretion of the designer and administration for a given NBT league. In general, however, when Mercenary factions are available to occupy, since NBT is based in BTU, canon-based Mercenary corporations will be filled first, before "custom" factions are made available.
    In canon, the Mercenary Review And Bonding Commission typically handles the ranking and review of Mercenary corps for the benefit of both employer and employee factions; whether an MRBC is active and in force in a given NBT league is left to the discretion of the league designer and administration.

    Pirates

    Pirate units in NBT are typically lean operations with no initial holdings other than combat units and the means to transport them. They are designed to live off of raids and theft to fund their operations, but if they are skilled enough they can amass the weaponry required to carry out an assault in an effort to gain control of territory. If a pirate unit gains a sector of space, they are automatically promoted to the level of a small periphery state. The presence of pirates in any given NBT league is at the sole discretion of the league designer and administration.

    Applying For A Faction

    Faction application periods and how factions are assigned to applicant teams, is at the discretion of that league's administration, but all faction applications share one thing in common: in order to apply for a faction, the applicant must have an account registered with the NBT Automation. This account will be the one initially assigned "the keys" to the faction. Any league-specific rules or restrictions pertaining to faction applications will be listed on the league-specific rules pages.

    Setting Up A Faction

    NBT Leagues may have their own specific rules for setting up a faction, but in general (or in the absence of any league-specific rules), the following apply:
    • Once a team has the "keys" to the faction, they are allowed to begin setting up the faction. This includes choosing the initial combat unit allotment, and placing the initial industry allotment. This is performed in the automation and the team can change their setup as often as they like up until they go "live" in their faction (at which point changes occur on the basis of combat and economic activity).
    • During setup the team should also define any additional roles they would like, to grant various members of their team different levels of access to their faction. While access is defined in terms of roles, it is granted in terms of various areas of the faction's automation (viewing faction details on the starmap, for instance; or launching and logging battles; all the way up to full control of the faction). Given the battle logging rules defined elsewhere in these pages, it is recommended that teams at least provide a few members of their staff the ability to log battles on behalf of the team and the faction.
    • Charge Stations in a faction's space are set up by league administration and are not subject to further customization by the team setting up the faction, either during initial setup or during the playing of the league.
    • Jumpships must be placed at a planet in the faction's space. Jumpships can all be placed around the same planet initially and jumped to their final destination if desired; note that jumps during setup will be free (and instantly recharge, regardless of the presence of a charge station), or placed strategically around the faction's space. After a team goes "live" with their faction, normal jump fees and recharging rules apply.
    • Combat Units must be placed on a planet during setup; once setup is complete and the faction "goes live", combat units may be loaded aboard dropships for movement around the faction's space, or in execution of attacks on opponents. During setup only, the choice of combat units must follow limits and ratios (if any), as defined by the specific league. See the league-specific rules and restrictions for more.

    Shutting Down A Faction

    Sometimes, a team must cease to operate a faction. This can be for one or more valid reasons (low pilot turnout, the faction becomes untenable due to fundamental losses of resources, etc.). Regardless the reason, NBT has some policies in place for such eventualities.
    When a team closes up shop, various actions are not allowed, and if attempted, will be immediately reversed or nullified by league administration:
    • Selling of combat units and/or jumpships is prohibited
    • Transferring sums of money (whether single lump transfers or "structured" transfers) to other factions is prohibited
    • Transferring of combat units or jumpships to other factions is prohibited
    Additionally, if funds are owed for any reason, NBT League Administration will handle the details and ensure all affected parties are made whole; teams are not to transfer huge sums on their way out the door.
    When a faction becomes untenable, options exist for the team occupying that faction to remain in the league, and possibly keep the faction name, if they like:
    • Faction materially eliminated from the league (lost all or most of their planets). Two options exist in this scenario:
      1. Team retains the faction name and become a Pirate or Mercenary faction. This would allow the team to keep whatever resources (including remaining planets) they had from the former faction. They would then gain the abilities of the chosen faction type (special jumps, for instance), as well as retain the option to regain their faction's former status if they can build the faction back up to the required levels.
      2. Close up shop entirely in Faction A, and take a completely new Mercenary or Pirate Faction B. This new faction starts with that faction type's initial resource set, and any remaining resources from the previous faction are lost. It would also be more difficult to upgrade to a larger faction at a later time.
    • Logistics and realities of life suggest that merging with another team may be a better course of action. For example, low pilot turnout prevents the team from meeting all of a faction's obligations. As NBT prefers teams and pilots to stay in the league, we offer an incentive for the team and/or pilots to remain.
      1. Once the merger goes through and demonstrates success (typically 1-2 months after the merger is complete) league administration will grant the faction that received the pilots, a modest booster pack, generally consisting of combat units and/or c-bills, but actual contents are at the discretion of the league administration.
      2. The original, shuttered faction must have been an established, active faction within the league. Gaming the system, such as setting up a "front" faction and ghost-running it for a month then shutting it down, with no actual activity, is prohibited and boosters will not be awarded in these cases (again, at the sole discretion of league administration).
      3. Planets and major resources (such as factories) are never considered for merging.
  4. Economics
    The primary limited resource in any NBT league is money. Money is required for everything in NBT -- purchasing combat units, means of transport (jumpships, dropships, etc), making jumps themselves, upgrading factories, maintaining the stores of military equipment that provide for a faction's offensive and defensive capabilities, and so on. And since NBT provides a fluid league setting, nearly all costs will change dynamically as a function of the standard supply-and-demand curves from Economics 101.
    It is not all expenses, however; factions receive regular income from the industrial output of their planets (or for planet-less factions such as Mercenaries, from the contracts they maintain with their employers). Additionally, factions with planets have the opportunity to upgrade the industrial output of their faction by re-investing revenue into industry. Thus a faction is forced to plan wisely to support their intended level of military activity (which always is more expensive than standard commercial activity).
    The unit of currency used in all NBT leagues is the c-bill.

    Income

    In all NBT leagues, income payments are made each Sunday at the same time (specifically, 23:59:00 UTC). This allows factions to receive a regular stream of income. Immediately after income is collected, expenses are automatically paid out from the faction's account. Expenses include the maintenance costs for all battle equipment as well as keeping the economic and political wheels greased.
    Both income and expenses are handled on a monthly basis, and the weekly payout (and expense settlement) simply divides those monthly amounts by four (4). This means that 4 times a year, extra income is collected (and expenses paid).
    Each planet on the starmap has an industry level assigned to it. These levels are partially set during faction setup; the majority of a faction's startup industry is automatically placed (and can't be reduced, only augmented, by the faction) to prevent teams from concentrating all of their industry in their interior, away from the danger of enemy aggression. The amount of industry (monthly output) per planet can range from 0-500,000,000 c-bills (different leagues may impose different limits -- consult your league's rules for specifics). As mentioned, once a faction is live, the faction can invest in their planets' industry levels by purchasing additional output (on a per-planet basis) for between 5 and 13 (inclusive) times the amount of increases. So, for example, to increase a planet's output by 100,000,000 c-bills, at an 8x multiplier, it would cost the faction 800,000,000 c-bills to perform the upgrade (this simulates, for example, the capital investment necessary to make a manufacturing firm more productive, etc.). The industry multiplier varies per day in the range prescribed above, on a random basis; whether this is a 1.0 probability curve or some other distribution is used, is solely at the discretion of the league designer and/or administrator, and will not be disclosed publicly.
    Maximum Income & Maximum Funds. No unit may have more than a certain league-specific number of c-bills in their account. If they exceed this amount when funds are issued, a "worker's holiday" is declared and no income is received (but expenses are still paid). The goal of NBT is combat in the simulator/game, not hoarding cash. Funds are meant to enable combat between factions in the league, and are not themselves part of "victory conditions" (no "extra points" are awarded for having cash in the bank). Additionally, factions with more than X planets may not exceed an amount of industry equal to Y times the number of the faction's planets (where X and Y are prescribed on a per-league basis). These limits are at the discretion of the league administrator and once set for a season, will not change. The limits for a given league will be publicly posted as part of that league's specific rules.
    Selling Resources. Another form of income can be realized by selling faction resources, generally via the Black Market. Two forms of sale can occur -- direct sale, where the item(s) in question are typically sold at a discount ("need the cash now", in other words); and "consignment" sale, where it may be possible to realize a premium price for the item(s) but the time and date of sale may be in the future. This second option is the only way for units to sell to one another, and is monitored closely by league administration for patterns of abuse. This method ALWAYS will be more expensive than buying the same item (if possible) on the open market (due to the involvement of the broker as middleman).

    Expenses

    The following table of jump costs is a base set of costs and may be changed on a per-league basis at any time by league administration. Additionally, a league designer or administrator may override these costs prior to the start of the league; in this case the custom values will be published in that league's specific ruleset.
    Unlike many governments in the real world, the faction governments in NBT may not run a deficit; in other words, factions may not spend "into the red" and wait for payday to make up the difference. Note that the league economy design does not prevent a faction from becoming "insolvent" -- incurring more costs per cycle than income in that cycle, and if a faction becomes insolvent, league administration may take steps to remedy the situation. What steps are involved will be decided on a case-by-case basis, but common remedies often include liquidating civilian and military assets to reduce the faction's cost burden to a sustainable level.
    Jump costs by jump type and jumpship class. These costs are assessed and collected at the time of the action. If insufficient funds are available to perform the jump, the entire jump will fail (in the case where multiple ships are jumping at the same time).
    (values in c-bills)
    Jump Type Combat Flagship Transport (non-combat)
    Normal 500,000 1,000,000 200,000
    Clan/Merc/Periph-Link 50,000,000 100,000,000 25,000,000

    Purchasing Resources

    Resources in NBT include anything that a faction may use to prosecute military campaigns, including the means of combat-unit production (factories) and the industrial base necessary to fund it all. The following may be purchased and delivered to various parts of your space. Certain restrictions apply to each.
    • Combat Units. Cost and availability vary by item and type. Factory Production and Black Market are the only avenues available for direct purchase of combat unit resources.
    • Industry Upgrade. 5-13 c-bills (inclusive, changes randomly per day) per c-bill of industry upgrade. Can be applied to any owned planet, to a league-specific maximum output per planet.
    • Jumpship Purchase. The following factions have the ability to produce additional jumpships at any of their factories (this list is based on canon):
      • House Steiner (Federated/Lyran Commonwealth/Lyran Alliance)
      • House Davion (Federated Commonwealth/Federated Suns)
      • House Marik (Free Worlds League)
      • House Kurita (Draconis Combine)
      • House Liao (Capellan Confederation)
      • Free Rasalhague Republic
      • Word Of Blake
      • Clan Diamond Shark
      • Clan Snow Raven
      This ability belongs to the faction, not the factories, so taking a CSR factory, for example, does not transfer the ability to manufacture jumpships to the capturing faction. Additionally, jumpships themselves may not be captured by enemy forces. Costs for jumpship purchases are determined on a per-league basis.
    • Dropship Purchase. As dropships are not "nearly LosTech" (as jumpships are), any faction may produce dropships at any of their factories. Costs are based on capacity and certification (combat dropships, for instance, will be more expensive than civilian merchant dropships) and will also fluctuate with the galactic economy (as with everything else in NBT that has to be manufactured and can be purchased). Combat dropships can be captured during hostile actions. The base cost for all dropships for both Clan and Inner Sphere is determined on a per-league basis.
    • Flagship Upgrade. All factions have the ability to upgrade a combat jumpship to a flagship at will. In order to qualify for upgrade, the jumpship to be converted
      • must have N hardpoints or be of X class
      • must be present at the faction capital
      • must not have any dropships docked to it.
      The upgrade costs differ for Clan and IS factions, and are prescribed on a per-league basis.

    Black Market

    The Black Market in NBT is exactly what it sounds like -- an "alternate procurement channel" for obtaining military hardware in which a faction may find itself in need. The contents of the Black Market follow the same supply-and-demand law that the above-board economy in NBT uses, but often at a steep premium for rare or desirable items (and a steep discount for "stuff no one wants"). The Black Market is stocked by sales of military hardware from the stores of the factions that make up the league, as well as the occasional addition from other, more mysterious sources.
    Black Market purchases can be delivered, instantly, to any planet
    • owned by the purchasing faction, or
    • where the purchasing faction has at least 10 combat units (of any type) in Allied Garrison
    unless the planet is in full battle lockdown (Black Market purchases can be delivered to a planet under attack prior to full battle lockdown, however). If a purchase is made to be delivered to a planet not eligible for immediate delivery, the purchaser may
    • cancel the purchase, or
    • schedule immediate delivery to an eligible planet, or
    • have the combat units delivered into mothball on the original planet of delivery

    Maintenance

    Nothing takes care of itself; without regular maintenance, entropy dictates that your finely-tuned combat forces will rust and crumble under their own weight. As such, maintenance costs are deducted from your account with each income cycle. The actual costs will vary by league and by type of combat unit or jumpship/dropship. Additional costs are incurred per planet and charge station in your space, for the same reasons.

    Transferring Money

    Money may be transferred between factions (including those not allied with each other) at any time, for any reason. NBT Administration is notified of each of these transfers and if they are not on the up-and-up, may initiate an investigation into the transfer (potentially reversing it if it is deemed unsuitable). A fee is charged for all transfers, on a scale related directly to the alliance level between the two factions involved. See Alliances, Diplomacy and Espionage for more details on the mechanics of faction alliances.
  5. Factories And Production
    Anything that may be purchased (aside from industry) by a faction, is handled at a factory location. Factories are set up for a faction by the league designer and/or administrator, generally following BTU canon but deviating where necessary to achieve league balance and "fun". Purchases may be made at any owned factory, and any factory owned by a faction with whom the purchasing faction has at least a pre-determined level of alliance. (See Alliances, Diplomacy and Espionage for more on the mechanics of alliances). The sole exception to this rule is that pirates may purchase from any un-owned factory on the starmap.

    Factory Output And Prices

    The NBT economy is intended to mimic, as closely as possible, the economy in the "real world" when it comes to supply-and-demand and the "network effects" they have not only on the sale prices of final production output, but also the availability itself. For instance, if an auto manufacturer produced a vehicle that everyone on Terra wanted to buy, the demand would far outstrip the supply, not only of the factory production stock, but also of the raw materials necessary to make the vehicle. The same applies to combat units in NBT; the more intensely popular a particular combat unit is, the more expensive it will be to purchase, and the longer it will take for them to be produced and delivered. Therefore, it is not possible to set a scale of prices (or delivery period) for any particular combat unit, as market forces will dictate these on a real-time basis in NBT. At league start, however, the delivery time for all combat units will be baselined at three (3) days per order.
    Note that factories will not continue to produce in the absence of orders or demand; this makes no economic sense in the real world either. A factory's production will fall off rapidly in the face of rising inventory, so the effect will be often instant availability for lesser-desired combat units.
    In BTU, many combat units have a "chassis" that is further classified by "variant" and "class". In NBT, there are three different ways to restrict factory output:
    • By Class. Factories can produce and sell all chassis and variants in a given class (for example, "Assault 'Mech" factories can produce any 'Mech that qualifies as "Assault").
    • By Chassis. Factories can produce and sell all variants of a given chassis (for example, "Awesome 'Mech" factories can produce any Awesome, such as AWS-8R, AWS-8Q, AWS-8T, and so on).
    • By Variant. The most restrictive option; factories can only produce and sell the variant "on the door" (for example, "Awesome AWS-8Q" factories can only produce the AWS-8Q).
    The type of factory production used by a given league is determined by the league designer and/or administrator, and is constant throughout that league.
    For the first two factory types, the league designer/administration may decide to allow (possibly substantial) discounts on the factory's "prime" variant (in a chassis-based factory system) or "prime" chassis (in a class-based factory system); this determination is made on a per-league basis.
    Factories have a tech-class designation as well -- a factory is either a Clan or Inner Sphere factory. See Cross-Tech below for more on how opposing tech affects factory production.

    Purchasing From Factories

    Factory purchases are typically made on a pre-order basis; that is, the order is placed and then the work begins to produce the item(s) purchased. If the items are in factory stock at the time the order is placed, the delivery is immediate; otherwise the time between the placement of order and delivery of the items is determined by the state of the supply chain for that item, as described above. In order to prevent "race conditions" in factory purchasing (which happens when multiple factions are waiting to pounce on the first available items off the line), all orders are fulfilled on a first-placed-first-filled basis. At the time of order, an "estimated time of delivery" is given to the buyer. The term "estimate" is used deliberately; in a dynamic market-based system of production, a super-popular type of combat unit may incur longer delays as more and more of them are purchased around the galaxy and the supply chain begins to back up. Therefore, there is no guaranteed time/date of delivery. Additionally, the factory owner will always get priority for orders they place, so they can effectively "jump in line" in front of other orders for the same combat unit type. Purchasing factions will always be updated as to changes to the estimated delivery, as soon as they are known (typically, if the delivery date slips by one or more days). Estimates are re-evaluated every time another order for that unit type is placed anywhere in the galaxy, so updated estimates may be sent at irregular intervals.

    Placing An Order

    Regardless of the type of combat or transport unit being purchased, the purchaser must have a dropship or jumpship present on, or around, the planet where the factory is located. This allows the factory even to be seen by the purchaser (in the case of non-owned, allied factory purchases). This is intended to force the purchaser to consider logistics in prosecuting their military campaigns and defenses. Said dropship or jumpship does not need to stay at the planet until delivery is effected (although it is recommended that dropships remain behind and serve as a free place in which to take delivery of the product, as mothball charges will be incurred for delivery to mothball storage on the factory planet).
    Once an order has been placed and funds have cleared, an invoice for the order (marked as "paid") will appear in the purchasing faction's accounting interface in the NBT automation. This invoice also contains the estimated delivery date/time for the purchased product, and will also automatically receive any updates to the delivery estimate. The purchasing faction has 48 hours from the time of order placement to cancel the order with a full refund; after that, a 50% "restocking fee" will be deducted from the invoice total for the factory to cancel the order. The order will be put back in factory stock and either made available to fill the next invoice in line, or simply be available the next time someone orders that combat unit type.
    Alliances. Alliance levels also factor into the price and fee scale involved in a factory purchase. Discounts are increased as the alliance level increases; the specific discount schedule is determined on a per-league basis. A surcharge always applies to purchases made at allied factories; this surcharge is paid by the purchaser, but not to the factory owner. The factory owner receives a percentage of the purchase price (including surcharge), commensurate with the alliance level. All of these charges and fees are prescribed per-league, and all will appear on the invoice.

    Order Delivery

    As mentioned above, if the purchasing faction has left a dropship behind (with enough capacity to load the full order), the products will be delivered to that dropship free of charge. Otherwise, delivery will be made to the factory's "mothball" storage area, and a fee assessed for each day the product remains in storage. 7 days after delivery, if the order has not been picked up, it will be considered "abandoned" and the purchaser will forfeit all claim to funds tendered. The order will go back into factory stock and will be available for purchase by anyone else (including the original purchaser).
    Optionally, the purchaser can arrange for delivery of the final product to a planet in their space; this service is not cheap but it does allow the purchaser another option in terms of taking delivery of their product. Normal jump times apply, so there could also be considerable delay in the delivery of the product. The purchaser may change the planet of delivery at any time prior to completion of the order at the factory; after that time, delivery change charges will apply.
    If you choose to have the products delivered to the mothball area of the factory planet and the factory planet comes under attack after delivery, you may still collect your order and take them off the planet (even if the planet is in full battle lockdown), but you will not be allowed to move them to a primary or allied garrison directly from mothball at any time.

    Factory Upgrades And Creation

    Factions may either upgrade existing factories (increase production capacity, add new factory production lines, etc.), or create a new factory from scratch. The latter option is by far the most expensive and time-consuming, but it may be the only means by which a faction can obtain the military hardware it needs.
    Cost Lead Time
    Expand Existing Factory 250x Combat Unit Cost 10 days
    Create New Factory 750x Combat Unit Cost 30 days
    Note that a faction may only create factories of its own class (Clan factions can create or upgrade Clan factories; Inner Sphere factions can create or upgrade Inner Sphere factories). This means that an Inner Sphere faction, in capturing a Clan factory, can not expand production of Clan technology at that factory -- it is stuck at the level it was at capture. The sole exception is Cross-Tech, described below.

    Cross-Tech

    A faction may, during the course of their combat activity, capture a significant amount of cross-technology. At some point, they will have collected enough of the technology in question for their scientists to be able to reverse-engineer the technology; the number that equates to "enough" in that sentence is determined on a per-league basis, and is counted in terms of combat units repaired or stolen as a result of the combat action. Once the faction has reached this number, it may begin expanding its own factories to produce the combat unit type or variant in question.
  6. Planets And Sectors
    Combat Units are what you fight with; planets are what you fight over. Planets are your source of income, and where your factories live. Your regular income is derived from the industry on your planets.

    Sectors

    Each faction's space is comprised of planets, which are further divided into "sectors". Combat in NBT happens at the sector level; whether the action is a Sector Raid or Sector Assault, it happens for all planets in the sector at once. For Sector Assaults, the victor gains (or retains) control of the entire sector.
    Each sector is comprised of a capital planet, and 1 or more member planets. Beyond the roles played by each in Sector Assaults and Sector Raids, no difference exists between the two types of planet in a sector.
    The number of planets a faction controls determines the range of the number of planets per sector in their space. This further impacts the scale of the battles involving those sectors.
    Total Planet Count Sector Planet Count Range Sector Raid Scale
    Fewer than 50 4-8 3 drops
    50 or more, fewer than 200 6-10 4 drops
    200 or more 8-14 5 drops
    The reason that smaller factions have fewer drops per raid is to keep their activity levels within reasonable limits for their size; it is assumed that smaller factions are controlled by smaller teams with a lower sustained activity level. These drop counts are subject to change at any time by a league's administrator.

    Industry

    Each planet in a faction's space can produce c-bills for the faction. During faction setup, a team will be given a certain amount of industry it must place around the faction's space. To speed up faction setup, the majority of that industry will be automatically placed for the faction when the team acquires the keys to the faction; this industry cannot be reduced during setup. The remainder is placed manually by the team, and can be used to augment the automatically-placed industry.
    The maximum number of combat units allowed in a sector is governed by the amount of industry in the sector; this is to keep defense levels commensurate with sector worth -- the greater the industry level, the greater the number of combat units can be employed to defend that industry. Since these limits are at the sector level, no practical limits will exist on the number of combat units allowed per planet.
    Additionally, for sectors containing factories, the level of industry affects the delivery time of combat assets produced at those factories. This models the "network effect" in the economy -- if delivery time is to be reduced for units in high demand, then investment must be made in the supply chain for those units. For example, if a particular Battlemech is extremely popular, and only one supplier is making lower-leg actuator assemblies, then production on that Battlemech will necessarily be slow, unless new suppliers are created or the existing supplier's capacity is expanded. Both of these actions are modeled by aggregate investment in industry.
    Industry may be increased on any planet, up to a per-league level. The cost of industry increases will fluctuate daily on as random basis, and will be in the range of 5-13 c-bills per c-bill of industrial output. Industry is purchased on a planetary basis, and the investment cost will be debited to the faction's account at the time of investment (not at the time of delivery). The additional industrial output will take effect at the next income disbursement cycle, but no sooner than 3 days after the investment is made. Since "payday" in NBT is Sunday 23:59:00 UTC, in order for industry investment to take effect with the next payday following the investment, it must be purchased no later than Thursday, 23:58:59 UTC.
    Each of your planets is a living, breathing thing. Occasionally they go through economy problems, or maybe a diamond mine is discovered, boosting the economy. As such, during the course of the league you will notice that many of your planets industry levels will vary from month to month. This variation will be small in the grand scheme of things (up to a 25 million change, up or down) but taken together can cause a modest impact upon the league and your strategies.

    Political Instability

    As detailed in the section on Sector Raids, one or more planets in a sector may go into what is known as "political instability". In addition to Raid effects, PI may occur randomly due to governmental issues on the planet or in the sector. Political Instability continues for 30 days after inception, and will clear up on its own if left to its own devices. A faction may also choose to correct the situation by suitable infusion of funds (defined as "50% of the planet's industry level") at the 20-day mark. This is performed on a per-planet basis. The negative effects of Political Instability include:
    • No industrial output (this also affects factory outputs as described above).
    • Planet owner and allies may not reinforce the planet; dropships on the planet remain on the planet, and no dropships can land. Transfers from Mothball on the planet are permitted.
    • Attacks are still possible on the planet during this time.
    • Enemy jumpships can pass through the system without a battle being generated (the planet is treated as "Unassigned" for this purpose).
    • Planets with Charge Stations recharge ALL jumpships, friendly and enemy.

    Sector Mech Limits

    Each planetary sector can sustain military garrisons of a certain size. This size is directly proportional to the industry present in the sector. The proportion of combat units relative to sector industry, is covered in the league-specific rules.
    The garrison for a sector is comprised of all combat units present in the sector, in "Active Duty" status.
    Over-garrisoning a sector will produce effects common to all NBT leagues.
    • Battle Penalties - Over-garrisoning a sector, as with over-attacking during a Sector Assault (i.e. sending in more attacking units than the defending sector's industry would support) will damage the sector's industry, and lower your salvage. The more units you have, the greater the damage (twice the # of units means 50% industry destruction, and only 5% salvage gained). Over-Garrisoning will result in a 10% industry destruction, no matter the level of over-garrison. Attackers that damage the industry on a successful SA will be auto-charged to repair the damaged industry at the industry prices current at the time the battle is fully logged.
    • Industry Penalty - Each day that a sector is Over-Garrisoned, the faction will be charged a fee of 2% of the total sector industry. This represents the additional cost of keeping such a large garrison in a sector that cannot support them.
    • Damage To Combat Units - Each week that a sector is Over-Garrisoned, military equipment will begin to fall into disrepair, and eventually be disabled and unusable. In order to prevent this, a substantial sum must be paid each week, based upon the amount of over-garrison present. This sum also represents the costs incurred to prevent the sector falling into political instability as a result of the tensions between the populace and the heightened military presence. The amount that must be paid is a percentage of sector industry and the exact percentage is covered in the league-specific rules.
    • Allied Garrison - While a faction is over-garrisoning their own sector, their allies can not bring combat units into the sector to help with its defense.
    • Political Instability - When a Sector Assault is completed in a sector that was over-garrisoned or over-attacked, there is a scaled chance that the sector will fall into political instability. The greater the overage, the greater the chance that political instability will occur.
    Under-garrisoning or under-attacking a sector will produce bonuses to the victor, up to 75% salvage bonus.

    Allied Garrison

    Every planet can support both owned and allied garrison forces. In order for an ally to place a garrison on one of your planets, they must first be set to a positive alliance level (see Alliances, Diplomacy and Espionage for details). Allied Garrison is counted towards the combat unit count when considering over-garrison penalties. A planet may have garrisons from one or more allies on any given planet. In order for an ally to participate in any battle on the planet, or have Black Market mechs delivered to the planet, they must have at least ten (10) combat units present in Active Duty status on the planet.
    If the relationship between a faction and another with combat units in Allied Garrison on one or more of its planets deteriorates to the point where the alliance level becomes neutral (zero), then all combat units owned by the allied faction will be placed in "Mothball" status; these combat units will become unusable in battle until pulled off the planet or the alliance is restored. If the alliance deteriorates further (becomes negative), then a Sector Raid will be launched by the formerly allied faction (regardless of defend limits) and become immediately active (in "Forcedec" mode with no chance for either side to reinforce).

    Mothball Storage Area

    Factory planets have an additional storage area that can be used to hold newly produced combat units awaiting pickup by the purchaser. Combat units that are stored in this area are NOT usable in combat. They may be transferred to allied garrison (Active Duty status), but once the planet is locked, combat units in the mothball area are unusable in the planets defense. The mothball area is NOT locked by a battle. Combat units may still be transferred to and from the area (Factory Purchases, transfers to Dropships). Mothball units suffer from increased maintenance costs due to their being kept in a heightened state of readiness (generally always recently purchased units).

    Planet Lockdown

    Once a battle has been launched, the Reinforcement begins. Any combat units on planet in the sector under attack may NOT be removed from the surface of any planet in the sector; they are there for the duration of the battle. During this time period both the defender and attacker (including allies) may transfer combat units to the surface of planets in the sector, at will via dropship.
    The Reinforce period of a battle expires after an amount of time set per league; if a given NBT league does not set its own value for this, the time period defaults to 18 hours after the battle is launched. Additionally, the two primary factions involved (attacker and defender) may agree to close the reinforcement window (and generate a battle forcedec) at any time during this Reinforce period. See the Attacks And Battles section for details.
    Once the Reinforcement period has expired, no additional forces may be transferred to planets within the sector. It is effectively isolated until the battle is resolved. Jumpships may still jump into the sector, but they may not continue further into enemy space. They must jump into allied space to continue jumping. This time window allows for the following to occur:
    • Gives the Attacker ample time to position all of his forces.
    • Gives an Allied Attacker time to jump in-system to join the fight.
    • Gives the Defender some time to reinforce the planet, if he can, either with his own forces, or with those of a nearby ally.
  7. Transportation And Movement
    Jumpships: Movement around the galaxy (both peaceful and military) is made possible by vehicles known as "jumpships", which are equipped with the faster-than-light "Kearny-Fuchida Drive". This enables them to jump between star systems in a matter of seconds. All factions in NBT possess at least one jumpship, and some factions possess the ability to manufacture additional jumpships.
    Dropships: Jumpships themselves do not carry any cargo; instead, they have a number of "hardpoints" that are used to dock a transport container vessel known as a "dropship"; the dropships jump with the jumpships. Dropships in NBT are what move combat units to and from a planet's surface, both for peaceful as well as military purposes. Dropships have various configurations and therefore can hold different numbers of different types of combat units. The types of dropships available and their configurations are specified per league. Dropships are relatively cheap compared to jumpships and all factions can produce dropships at their factories. Additionally, dropships can be destroyed in combat (see league-specific rules covering cases where dropships can be destroyed).
    Jump Distance: The maximum distance a jumpship can jump is 60 light-years (LY). Regardless of distance, a jumpship will use the full charge to make the jump, whether jumping 1 LY or 60 LY. Some faction classes possess "special" jump types; the distance limit on these "special" jumps is 500LY regardless of faction or jump type.
    Jump Costs: Costs vary with the size and type of the jumpship, and are determined on a per-league basis; consult the league-specific rules for jump costs for your league.
    Jumpship Charging: All jump types are instantaneous. After a jump is completed, the solar sail will deploy and recharge the K-F Drive. This takes an average of 3 days, depending on the Star Class of the current system. Every system has a "Morgan-Keenan" Star Class assigned to it, based upon the strength of the system star. The stronger the star, the faster your Jumpships recharge; the weaker the star, the longer it takes. The following is a breakdown of the Star Classes and the number of hours difference that they make to recharge times in NBT:

    Star Classes Table

    Spectral Class

    Star Subtype

    0

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    6

    7

    8

    9

    B

    -22

    -20

    -18

    -16

    -14

    -10

    -8

    -6

    -4

    -2

    F

    -14

    -12

    -10

    -8

    -6

    -2

     

    2

    +4

    +6

    A

    -18

    -16

    -14

    -12

    -10

    -6

    -4

    -2

     

    +2

    G

    -6

    -4

    -2

     

    +2

    +6

    +8

    +10

    +12

    +14

    K

    -2

     

    +2

    +4

    +6

    +10

    +12

    +14

    +16

    +18

    M

    +2

    +4

    +6

    +8

    +10

    +14

    +16

    +18

    +20

    +22

    F

    -14

    -12

    -10

    -8

    -6

    -2

     

    2

    +4

    +6

    A

    -18

    -16

    -14

    -12

    -10

    -6

    -4

    -2

     

    +2

    G

    -6

    -4

    -2

     

    +2

    +6

    +8

    +10

    +12

    +14

    K

    -2

     

    +2

    +4

    +6

    +10

    +12

    +14

    +16

    +18

    M

    +2

    +4

    +6

    +8

    +10

    +14

    +16

    +18

    +20

    +22

    Hovering over a planet on the Starmap will display a informative brief on the planet; this includes the calculated recharge time for the system.

    Jumpship Classes

    Jumpships are classified based on technology type (Inner Sphere or Clan) and combat worthiness (not all jumpships possess the navigational accuracy required to perform combat jumps, which typically require jumping to points in a system off of the standard navigation zenith or nadir). Jumpship types each have different numbers of hardpoints which limits how many combat units they can move at once (which additionally depends on the type of dropship docked to them).
    Command Flagship: Command Flagships: Flagships are Jumpships that have been modified to handle the extreme Command and Control functions that are needed to handle Sector Assaults. Only Flagships may launch the Sector Assault type battle. In every other respect, they are the same as any other Jumpship. Each faction will receive a set number of starting Command Flagships as well as a FlagCap (maximum number of flagships). The facton may not exceed their units FlagCap at ANY time. After an unsuccessful SA, the Flagship used cannot assault the same planet for a period of 30 days. Another Flagship will need to be used, or the same Flagship can assault another sector.
    Non-Combat Jumpships: These are primarily responsible for moving combat units within a faction's own space. They may only dock and undock dropships coming from or going to a non-battle-locked planet (a planet in a sector with an active battle). These jumpships typically have more hardpoints than combat jumpships, but may not be used in any combat situation (including garrison augmentation during the Reinforce phase of a battle).

    Types Of Jumps

    Certain jump types require a "friendly" alliance level for them to work.

    Combat Jumps

    Only "Normal" jumps are used to launch battles intentionally. These are also the only jump types that may be used to reinforce a sector under attack during the Reinforce phase of a battle. A Normal jump is limited to 60LY maximum to any planet. Jumps are allowed to any planet within 30LY. Jumps to planets beyond 30LY but less than 60LY must be to a friendly (owned or allied) planet, or an unassigned planet. Jumps to hostile planets beyond 30LY (but less than 60LY) are allowed if
    1. The planet greater than 30LY away is the nearest owned by that faction, and
    2. There are no planets within 30LY of the origin owned by that faction
    Consider the example in the snippet from the below from the NBT starmap:
    In this case, the white ring is the 30LY boundary and the green ring is the 60LY limit. The origin for the jump is Jarett, owned by Draconis Combine, Alshain MD (DC-A).
    • DC-A could attack the Clan Smoke Jaguar planet of Idlewind, but not Richmond, Rockland or Turtle Bay; even though those are within 60LY, the attack jump limit of 30LY takes precedence because Idlewind lies within 30LY of Jarett.
    • DC-A could attack either of the Clan Ghost Bear worlds of Constance or Trondheim, because they are both inside 30LY, but not any of the others, which all lie outside 30LY (even though they are within 60LY).
    • DC-A could attack the Free Rasalhague Republic world of Last Frontier, but not Susquehanna, Radlje or Jezersko, because Last Frontier is the closest FRR world to Jarett.
    • DC-A could perform a friendly jump to any of its own planets within 60LY, or to the allied DC Pesht MD planet of Schuyler.
    • DC-A could not jump to Luzerne as it lies beyond the 60LY limit.
    • DC-A could not attack the Clan Wolf planet of Skallevoll as it lies beyond the 60LY limit.

    Non-Combat Jumps

    TBD

    Miscellaneous

    • Jump movement to and from friendly planets (those owned by a faction or its allies) is unrestricted, regardless of battle status.
    • Jump movement to a hostile planet (one not owned by a faction or its allies) under battle lockdown must be followed by a jump to a friendly planet; the planet may not be used as a staging point for jumps further into enemy space.
    • Unassigned planets are treated as "friendly" for all, for the purposes of jumping; dropships may not be undocked at unassigned planets.
    • Combat jumps are restricted to space immediately adjacent to (abutting) a faction's owned space. A faction may not jump through an ally's space and attack assault a faction with whom they do not share a border. This restriction does not apply to Mercenaries or Pirates. This restriction applies to both Sector Raids as well as Sector Assaults. Factions may, however, participate in any battle assault launched by an ally, just not as the primary attacker or defender.
  8. Attacks And Battles
    On this page you will find information, requirements and restrictions about the types of battles supported in NBT. Specific information about Sector Assaults is handled separately.

    Battle Types

    NBT supports two battle types -- Sector Raid and Sector Assault. Sector Raids are launched for many reasons and can result in many different effects, but ownership of a sector does not change hands as a result. Sector Assaults are launched in order to take ownership of a sector from the defending faction.

    Battle Participants

    • Primary Defender: The faction that owns the sector being attacked. This faction is a required participant in the battle.
    • Primary Attacker: The owner of the first hostile jumpship to enter the sector being attacked. This faction is a required participant in the battle.
    • Allied Defender: One or more factions participating on the defending side of a Sector Assault (allied operations are only valid in Sector Assaults). These factions are optional participants in the battle.
    • Allied Attacker: One or more factions participating on the attacking side of a Sector Assault (allied operations are only valid in Sector Assaults). These factions are optional participants in the battle.
    In all cases, factions are restricted to using only the combat units they bring to the battle; combat units may not be "shared" among allied factions in a Sector Assault, nor can combat units in Allied Garrison be used by the sector owner during a Sector Raid or Sector Assault. Allied attacks or defenses must involve actual physical participation by the allied factions. In order to qualify for "allied faction" status in a given battle, at least ten (10) combat units owned by the allied faction must be present in the battle (typically provided during the Reinforce phase of the battle).
    For the purposes of scheduling, logging and inter-faction communication, battles are controlled by the primary defender and attacker for the duration of the battle; battles may not be "transferred" between allies in a Sector Assault.

    Basic Battle Mechanics

    Launching A Battle: Battles are launched as described in the Jumpships, Dropships and Travel section, by performing a Normal jump into enemy space with the required equipment (i.e. Flagship for a Sector Assault, etc.).
    Battle Reinforcement: Once a battle has been launched, the battle enters the "Reinforce" phase, where defenders and attackers (including allies in Sector Assaults) may augment the sector's defenses (or the attacking forces) by dropping additional dropships from jumpships in the system. This process is one-way -- combat units may arrive via dropship, but may not leave the planet on which they are present, once unloaded from their dropships. Dropships themselves may come and go, and are not required to stay around for the duration of the battle. The Reinforce phase lasts 18 hours after the battle is launched, subject to per-league overrides. Additionally, the primary factions in the battle may mutually agree to end the Reinforce period at any time during this phase and enter the Forcedec phase. Otherwise, the two primary factions must agree on a mutually-acceptable time and date to fight the battle in the league's game or simulator.
    Battle Forcedec: Once the Reinforce phase ends, the NBT automation will generate a "force declaration", or "forcedec". This marks the beginning of the Forcedec phase of the battle, and no more reinforcements will be allowed. The forcedec contains a list of the combat units initially available to each faction involved in the battle (factions can only see their own combat units), as well as the conditions of the battle (the list of maps, tonnage/battle-value restrictions, drop conditions, etc.) and publicly- available battle data (the primary factions involved, the attack date, the sector involved, the battle ID, etc.). This data is emailed to each member of the teams involved in the battle, who have been marked in the faction's roster as interested in this data, assuming that those individuals have opted into such emails. The forcedec is also available in the faction automation for view by anyone with access (see Sector Assaults for additional information about Sector Assault forcedecs). If the primary factions agree to end the Reinforce phase early, the forcedec is generated and emailed at that time.
    Battle Logging: Once the battle has been completed (see Sector Assaults for additional information about Sector Assault logging and tracking), the two primary factions must log the results in the automation.
    1. The primary attacker will log their combat units used and lost (if any)
    2. The primary defender will verify the attackers entries based on their records of the battle drops
      • If any discrepancies exist, the defender will reject the attacker's entries and the process will return to step (1). It is assumed that this will coincide with actual communication between the teams involved to clear up the issue.
      • If the defender agrees with the attacker's entries, the defender will enter their own combat units used and lost (if any).
      If the defender was victorious (or the attacker retreated), the defender will be given the opportunity to claim any repairs or salvage to which they are due. If the battle was a Sector Assault and the defender lost control of the sector, they are given the opportunity to offload any remaining combat forces onto dropships; if no dropships are available and none can be jumped into the sector in a timely fashion, the defender will forfeit all remaining forces in the sector to the attacker.
      Any credits earned during a Sector Raid (see below) are also spent at this time.
    3. The primary attacker will verify the defender's entries based on their records of the battle drops
      • If any discrepancies exist, the attacker will reject the defender's entries and the process will return to step (2). It is assumed that this will coincide with actual communication between the teams involved to clear up the issue.
      • If the attacker agrees with the defender's entries, the attacker will mark the logging as "Confirmed".
      If the attacker was victorious (or the defender retreated), the attacker will be given the opportunity to claim any repairs or salvage to which they are due.
      Additionally, the attacker will be given the opportunity to load their combat units (including repairs or theft) onto their dropships. If dropships are not present, the attacker must jump a jumpship with dropships of sufficient capacity to load their combat units off planet; failure to do so in a timely manner will result in forfeit of all combat units on the planet to the defender. If the battle was a Sector Assault and ownership changed hands, this step may be skipped (the defender would have had to provide the means to pull their forces off planet during their confirmation step).
      Any credits earned during a Sector Raid (see below) are also spent at this time.
    4. Finally, the battle outcome and status are updated, and the sector is unlocked. Any effects from a Sector Raid take effect immediately at this time.

    Battle Limits

    Battle limits are based upon your faction's current Activity Status. This is set in the Faction Administration section of your automation. As all battles in NBT are multi-drop affairs, no distinction is made between Sector Assaults and Sector Raids; they both occupy one "slot" in your defend limits.
    • Inactive factions: Inactive factions cannot be attacked, nor can they attack another faction. Inactive factions cannot jump to any planet that is not owned by that faction (including allies).
    • Semi-Active Factions: Semi-Active status is a level of activity that can be set by the League Admin if a faction is having attendance or burn-out problems. It enables the faction in question to continue in the league, but carry on with some battles rather than going fully inactive. Defensive Limits for Semi-Active status is 1 defensive slot. This is a temporary setting only, to give factions time to get their affairs in order, and then return to Active Status.
    • Active Factions: Active factions, regardless of size, effectively have no offensive battle limits. They can attack without restriction, within their ability to schedule and fight all their offensive and defensive battles within league time limits. Defensive battles for Active units are based on the size of the faction (in terms of number of planets controlled) and the number of pending offensive battles they have launched. The base defend limits are:
      • Factions with fewer than 70 planets: 1 defend slot
      • Factions with 70 or more planets: 2 defend slots
      A faction may control their own activity level, regardless of size, by managing their number of active attacking actions. The above numbers constitute the "base" defend limits; in practice, the actual number of active defends is equal to the number of active attacks a faction has launched, with the above numbers as a minimum. So a small faction with fewer than 70 planets can have two defend slots open if they have two attacks in progress at once.
      "Counter-attack" Sector Assaults are not subject to these defend limits. Therefore, an attacking faction that finds themselves victorious in a Sector Assault, even if they are at their defend limits, is subject to a "counter-attack" assault by the faction from whom they just took the sector (but only on that sector).

    Sector Raids

    Raids on an enemy sector are intended to model multiple simultaneous actions within the sector. As such, all drops in a raid are played, as from a "lore" perspective, success is not known until the whole action is complete. Additionally, once a combat unit is used, it is not available for subsequent drops in the raid. For example, if you bring 8 of Unit X to the raid and use 5 Unit X on the first drop, you will only have 3 Unit X available to subsequent drops. This is regardless of whether or not those units were destroyed. This models the fact that the raid is happening all at the same time throughout the sector.
    A faction may initiate a raid on a neighboring enemy sector for the purpose of inflicting various sorts of damage on the enemy faction, steal funds or military hardware from the enemy, or to carry out "diplomatic warfare" on the enemy. Raids do not result in the transfer of enemy planets or sectors, however.
    A faction may launch only one successful raid on an enemy sector in a period of 30 days; the faction may launch up to three consecutive unsuccessful raids on a sector, after which the 30-day waiting period applies.
    Sector Raids in NBT are inherently multi-drop affairs, in that more than one drop is required to resolve the battle. The number of drops involved depends on the size of the sector being attacked:
    Sector Planet Count Range Sector Raid Scale
    4-6 3 drops
    8-10 4 drops
    12-14 5 drops
    All drops are played; this is not a "best-of" scenario. Each drop is played for "effect credits", and the number of credits awarded to the winner of each drop is scaled based on success on that drop:
    Win Differential (Combat Units Destroyed) Credits Awarded
    0 (tie) 0 credits
    1-3 1 credit
    4-6 2 credits
    7-8 3 credits
    For game modes that involve objectives as an alternate win condition, winning the drop by objective qualifies as a +8 differential and 3 credits will be awarded to the victor, regardless of combat units lost on the drop.
    Each team may spend their credits on any combination of effects they wish (including none). Attacker effects include:
    • Combat Unit Theft: The attacker will be able to steal combat units from the sector's garrisons. This is a scaled-success mechanic -- greater positive differential between the attacker's and the defender's number of credits earned in the raid will increase the detail available to the attacker about the combat units present:
      • Negative Differential: Random selection
      • Zero Differential: Choice of combat unit type or class from those present
      • Positive Differential: Choice of actual combat unit from those present
      Each credit is worth the following number of tons:
      • Credits 1 and 2: 250 tons of combat units stolen
      • Credits 3 and 4: 100 tons of combat units stolen
      • Credits 5 and 6: 50 tons of combat units stolen
      • Credits 7+: 0 tons of combat units stolen
    • Industry Theft: The attacker will be able to steal industry from the total industrial production in the sector. This is a scaled-success mechanic -- greater positive differential between the attacker's and the defender's number of credits earned in the raid will increase the detail available to the attacker about the industrial output in the sector:
      • Negative Differential: No details about sector industry
      • Zero Differential: Total industrial output in the sector
      • Positive Differential: Per-planet listing of industrial output
      Each credit is worth 25,000,000 c-bills of industry stolen.
    • Industry Destruction: The attacker will be able to decrease the total industrial production in the sector. This is a scaled-success mechanic -- greater positive differential between the attacker's and the defender's number of credits earned in the raid will increase the detail available to the attacker about the industrial output in the sector:
      • Negative Differential: No details about sector industry
      • Zero Differential: Total industrial output in the sector
      • Positive Differential: Per-planet listing of industrial output
      Each credit is worth 25,000,000 c-bills of industry destroyed.
    • Factory Disruption: The attacker will be able to suspend factory output in the sector for a period of time. This is a scaled-success mechanic -- greater positive differential between the attacker's and the defender's number of credits earned in the raid will increase the detail available to the attacker about the factories present in the sector:
      • Negative Differential: No details about factory production, disruption will choose a random (possibly inactive) factory slot
      • Zero Differential: Type or class of unit produced at factory; disruption will choose a random active factory slot
      • Positive Differential: Per-factory listing of combat units produced; attacker may choose which slot(s) is(are) disrupted
      Each credit is worth 3 days of factory slot disruption.
    • Factory Destruction: The attacker will be able permanently to reduce factory output in the sector for a period of time. This is a scaled-success mechanic -- greater positive differential between the attacker's and the defender's number of credits earned in the raid will increase the detail available to the attacker about the factories present in the sector:
      • Negative Differential: No details about factory production, destruction will choose a random (possibly inactive) factory slot
      • Zero Differential: Type or class of unit(s) produced at factory; destruction will choose a random active factory slot
      • Positive Differential: Per-factory listing of combat units produced; attacker may choose slot(s) for output reduction
      Each credit is worth 1 combat unit worth of factory output reduction.
    • Political Instability: The attacker will be able to induce political instability in the sector for a period of time. This is NOT a scaled-success mechanic. Each credit is worth 10% chance of inducing political instability (cumulative) for 24 hours, or 3 days worth of political instability (on top of the base 24 hours). These can be used together; for instance, if an attacker has 10 credits to spend, they might spend 8 of them to increase the chance that political instability occurs, and the remaining 2 to extend the period to a week (7 days). Or they might spend all 10 to be certain that they induce 24 hours of political instability.
    • Espionage: The attacker will be able to place spies in the sector. See Diplomacy for more specifics. Credits can be spent on any combination of spy count and effectiveness; for instance, the victor in a sector raid may spend 5 credits on a single spy to watch military movements, and 3 on 3 different "novice" spies to watch other aspects of sector life. Or they may spend 8 credits on 4 2-credit spies and sift through the reported data themselves to correlate accuracy. Spy effectiveness is on a scale of 1-8, in terms of credits, and can only be set when the spy is placed in the sector.
      Spies can use the sector's communications networks and surveillance tactics to monitor military, economic and political activity in the sector, and report back to the sponsoring faction on activities in the sector such as troop/equipment movements, jumpship activity, industrial investment, and so on. The quality and effectiveness of the spy(s) placed depend on the amount of credits spent on them; a single spy worth ten credits will be able to provide detailed and accurate information on a single aspect of the sector's activity (for instance, military manuevers), but not other aspects such as economy and politics. More spies of lesser quality will be subject to greater chance of missing activity or possibly being fed misinformation; remember, the sector owner is likely spending funds on counter-espionage as well and those efforts will impact the effectiveness of your spies.
    Defender effects include:
    • Dropship Destruction: The defender may employ ground- and/or space-based defenses to destroy enemy dropships making their way back to their jumpship. This destroys the dropship and any combat units it is carrying. Combat units destroyed in this fashion are not subject to repair -- consider them vaporized. One credit per 5% chance of destroying one dropship.
    • Enhanced Security: The defender may spend credits to reduce the detail available to the attacker for combat unit or industry theft, or industry or factory disruption or damage. 1 defender credit per attacker credit offset. For example, if the credit differential at the end of the raid is +3 in favor of the attacker, the defender can spend 4 credits to reduce the attacker's level of detail as if the differential were negative. This depends on the attacker choosing to perform a theft, disruption or destruction. This is "game theory" in action.
    • Counter-Intelligence: Similar to how a defender can offset an attackers theft, disruption or destruction effectiveness with Enhanced Security, the defender can reduce the effectiveness of spies placed in their space by spending credits on counter- intelligence. The number of credits spent reduces the effectiveness of enemy spies, from the least effective to the most effective, by reducing their effective attacker credit spend by the number of credits the defender spends. For instance, if the attacker spends 8 credits to place one 5-credit, one 2-credit and one 1-credit spy, the defender can spend, say, 3 Counter- Intelligence credits to reduce the 2-credit spy to a 1-credit spy and the 5-credit spy to a 3-credit spy. Again, this depends on the attacker spending credits on spies (game theory again), and if the attacker does not spend anything on spies, the Counter-Intelligence credits are lost.
    • Political Stability: The defender can spend credits to offset the chance or the length of time that the sector will enter political instability, if the attacker chose to spend credits on Political Instability. The offset is 1 attacker credit per defender credit, and will offset attacker credits spent on duration (all the way to zero) before they offset attacker credits spent on chance of instability (again, all the way to zero).
    • Heightened State Of Alert: The defender can spend credits in an effort to prevent future raids on the sector for a period of time. This does not affect the ability for an opponent to launch a Sector Assault on the sector. Each credit is worth one (1) day worth of immunity from raids (from the date and time the current raid was logged). This allows factions the opportunity to prevent sectors from being in a permanent state of lockdown.

    Miscellaneous

    Counter-Attacks: As mentioned above in the section on battle limits, a faction that loses control of a sector in a Sector Assault retains the right to "counter-attack" with their own Sector Assault, on the sector they just lost, for a period of 30 days after the logging of the battle is complete. This MUST involve only the two primary factions from the Sector Assault (albeit now in reversed roles). These counter-attacks are not subject to defend limits.
    "No-Garrison" Victory: If the defender in a raid chooses not to defend a sector at all (no garrisons are present) or fails to do so by oversight, the attacker is awarded the maximum number of credits per drop for the sector (3 per drop). Note that the typical play in this situation would be for the attacker to ensure political instability for the sector, followed immediately by a Sector Assault (which would also be won in No-Garrison fashion, since political instability eliminates the opportunity for the defender to reinforce), so factions should be careful about leaving bits of their space undefended, especially if an enemy faction might have introduced spies into their sector(s) who can alert their factions to such a situation.
  9. Sector Assaults
    This section deals with the specifics of the major type of battle in NBT, the Sector Assault. Sector Assaults are the battles fought to claim, or retain, control of a sector of planets.
    Similar to Sector Raids, the Sector Assault uses a dedicated "tracker" to manage the state of the battle. The tracker generates all drop conditions (map, environment, tonnage, game mode, etc.) after the first drop (which is generated and distributed with the Sector Assault forcedec), and for that reason, it is required that teams log the battle progress as each drop is completed; as we will see, it most cases the tracker cannot know what state the battle will be in beyond the current drop.

    Overview

    The Sector Assault battle type in NBT is a multiple-drop battle, fought in different "phases". There are two phases in an NBT Sector Assault: "Assault" and "Siege". The "Assault" phase models the attacker's push to the sector capital, and the "Siege" phase models the attack on the sector capital itself.

    Assault

    The number of drops in the primary "Assault" phase is determined by the number of planets in the sector being contested, and the success of each contestant in the battle. As the Assault phase models the march of the attacker towards the sector capital, this phase is considered to be fought on each non-capital ("member") planet in the sector, in sequence. In order to proceed to the Siege phase, the attacker must "capture-and-hold" the majority of member planets in the sector, at which time the assault moves to the Siege phase. If the attacker fails to capture-and-hold a majority of member planets in the sector, they are repelled from the sector and the defender is considered victorious in the Sector Assault, and retains control.
    As part of launching the battle, the Attacker will have chosen the order in which the member planets will be contested; this models the "due diligence" the attacker would have exercised in preparing for the battle (as it is expected they would have tailored their forces and strategy to the terrain classes of the member planets in the sector). The actual maps to be played are chosen from the list of maps associated with the particular terrain classes of the planets when the drops for those planets are generated.
    The "capture-and-hold" mechanic is implemented as follows:
    • When the battle moves to Member Planet "A", a single drop is played for the "capture" of the planet by the attacker.
    • If the attacker wins the "capture" drop, they must immediately "hold" the planet by defending it from counter-attack by the defender (the roles are reversed for this drop, and the attacker becomes the defender and the defender becomes the attacker, for that drop).
      • If the defender wins the "hold" drop for the planet, they are considered to regain control of the planet and the planet is no longer "in play" for the rest of the Assault phase of the battle.
      • If the attacker wins the "hold" drop for the planet, they are considered to maintain control of the planet and the planet is no longer "in play" for the remainder of the Assault phase of the battle.
      • Regardless, when the "hold" drop has ended, if the Assault phase continues, then the next drop will be a "capture" drop for the next planet in the list.
    • If, however, the attacker loses the "capture" drop, the defender maintains control of the planet and the planet is no longer "in play" for the remainder of the Assault phase of the battle. The Assault phase moves onto the next planet in the list.
    • If, at any time during the Assault phase, the defender has maintained control of a majority of contested member planets, the attacker is considered to have failed and the defender is considered victorious in the battle.
    We will use the starmap image below to illustrate the Assault phase.
    In this example sector, there are ten planets, one of which is the sector capital (Saltillo). Therefore, in order to proceed to the Siege phase, the attacker will need to capture, and hold, 5 of the 9 member planets in the sector. In this case, the minimum number of drops in the assault could be 5 -- if the defender wins all of the Assault drops, the battle is over. The maximum number of drops in this Assault phase could be 18 -- assuming the attacker captured 9, held 4 and failed to hold 4, and the final "hold" drop (the 18th drop in the Assault phase) is to determine whether or not the assault is over, or moves onto Siege phase.
    For example, lets say that the attacker chose the following order in which to play the Assault phase:
    1. Tamarind
    2. Millungera
    3. Schererville
    4. Simpson Desert
    5. Promised Land
    6. Nockatunga
    7. Kosciusko
    8. Griffith
    9. Epsilon
    The first drop of the Sector Assault will be a "capture" drop for Tamarind, and the conditions for this drop will be included in the forcedec generated and email to the teams involved.
    Since it is unknown whether or not the next drop will be a "hold" or the next "capture", conditions for subsequent drops cannot be generated until this first drop is complete. This is true of all drops in the Assault phase; the tracker can only generate drop conditions once the current drop is completed (and logged, which makes it vital that teams log each drop as the battle is played).
    Lets say that the attacker won the Tamarind "capture" drop; the tracker will generate the map, tonnage/BV and conditions for the "hold" drop on Tamarind; the attacker will now play the role of defender, and the defender will play the role of attacker, for this drop only.
    Assume that the attacker wins the hold drop -- for the duration of this Assault phase, the planet Tamarind is under their control, and they need only to capture and hold 4 more planets in the sector. Even if the attacker lost the hold drop (and the defender maintains control of Tamarind for the duration of this Assault phase), the tracker will move the battle to the next planet, Millungera, for the "capture" drop, and the attacker and defender return to their original roles.
    Lets say that the attacker loses the Millungera "capture" drop; the defender retains control of Millungera and the attacker cannot try to attack it again this Assault phase. The attacker does, however, need to capture and hold only 4 of the remaining 7 planets "in play" in the sector for this Assault phase, if they wish to move the assault to Siege.
    Finally, lets say that the attacker captured and held Schererville and Simpson Desert, failed to capture and/or hold Promised Land and Nockatunga, and then captured and held Kosciusko and Griffith. The Sector Assault then moves immediate to the Siege phase.

    Siege

    The Siege phase of a Sector Assault models the final assault on the sector capital itself. Since the capital of any sector is expected to have the toughest defenses, a single drop or two does not suffice to determine control of the capital, and therefore the sector. The battle for the sector capital is fought as a best-of-5, on maps chosen from the sector capital's terrain class rotation, with generally higher tonnages or BV than were used in the Assault phase. If the attacker wins 3 of the 5 Siege drops, they are considered victorious and are awarded control of the sector. If the defender wins 3 of the 5 Siege drops, the battle is put back into the Assault phase, and the number of planets put back "in play" is determined by the success of the defender during Siege; a 3-0 romp in Siege will push the attacker farther back (more member planets restored to defender control) than will a 3-2 squeaker. The number of planets restored to defender control (if the defender wins Siege) is equal to the difference between the numbers of drops won by the defender and the attacker; a 3-0 win means 3 planets randomly restored to defender control, 3-1 means 2 planets, 3-2 means one planet.

    Miscellaneous

    Inline Repairs

    As the Sector Assault is considered to be a march through a sector, planet by planet, it is possible to introduce the "repair" mechanic to the Sector Assault.
    After each drop, the winner of the drop will be offered the opportunity to repair one or more combat units that were destroyed on the drop. The number of choices offered will be scaled in direct proportion to the margin of success; an 8-0 win will provide more choices than an 8-7 win (even though there are more destroyed units - 15 instead of 8 - available). In addition, the number of repairs that can be made increases in direct proportion to the success on the drop; a margin of victory of 6-8 will allow the victor to repair up to 3 destroyed units; a margin of 3-5 will allow 2, and a margin of 1 or 2 will allow 1. For game modes that have an alternate objective condition for success, the victor is considered to have won by a margin of 8, and will be offered the maximum number of units to repair, or the number of total units (friendly and enemy) actually destroyed on the drop, whichever is less. So if a drop is won on objectives with a 2-0 score, only 2 units can be repaired, even though the victor technically would be eligible for 3.
    "Inline" repairs follow the normal rules for repairs in NBT, in terms of costs, cross-tech rules, and so on.

    Tonnage/Battle-Value (BV)

    Different NBT leagues use different drop-limiting metrics, and the Sector Assault tracker will use the metric chosen by that particular league (either tonnage or battle value).
    Additionally, tonnage and BV ranges and distribution curves are set on a per-league basis, so please consult your league's specific rules for the current values in use for the league.

    Voluntary Retreats

    At any point during a Sector Assault, one side or the other may recognize that the battle cannot be won (at least, not given the current conditions and military equipment available), and may elect to retreat the battle. Additionally, attrition (in terms of combat units available) may force one side or the other to retreat the battle, if they can no longer field a full legal drop from their available combat forces. In these cases, the following rules apply:
    • Defender Retreat From Siege: The defender may retreat from Siege with 25% of their remaining forces intact (randomly chosen).
    • Attacker Retreat From Siege: The attacker may retreat from Siege with 100% of their remaining forces intact.
    • Defender Retreat From Assault:
      • If the defender has retained control of more than one (1) member planet contested in the Assault phase, they may retreat with 100% of their forces intact.
      • If the defender has retained control of one (1) member planet contested in the Assault phase, they may retreat with 50% of their forces intact (randomly chosen).
      • If the defender has retained control of no member planets contested in the Assault phase, they may retreat with 25% of their forces intact (randomly chosen).
    • Attacker Retreat From Assault:
      • If the attacker has gained control of more than one (1) member planet contested in the Assault phase, they may retreat with 100% of their forces intact.
      • If the attacker has gained control of one (1) member planet contested in the Assault phase, they may retreat with 50% of their forces intact (randomly chosen).
      • If the attacker has gained control of no member planets contested in the Assault phase, they may retreat with 25% of their forces intact (randomly chosen).
    In all cases, retreats are logged as such in the Outcome for the battle ("Defender Retreat" or "Attacker Retreat").

    Logging

    Log as you go: All drops must be logged as they are played; as described earlier, the Sector Assault tracker cannot generate conditions for subsequent drops until the current drop is fully logged and confirmed.
    Allied Logging: Only the primary attacker can log Sector Assault battle drops. If allied combat units are to be used on drops, a representative of the primary faction, with the proper permissions necessary to log Sector Assault battle drops, must be present during those drops. The allies are not able to log drops in the Sector Assault on their own.
    Final Battle Logging: Sector Assault battle logging and confirmation are integrated into the Sector Assault tracker. All of the steps described below are found in the Sector Assault tracker interface. When victory conditions are met or a retreat has been performed by either side, the two primary factions will log and confirm the battle in the following manner:
    1. Attacker will confirm their combat units used and destroyed, and submit this with the outcome (Attacker Victorious, Defender Victorious, Attacker Retreat, Defender Retreat) using the Sector Assault tracker interface.
    2. Defender will confirm the attacker's units used and lost, and confirm the battle outcome. If any discrepancies are found, the defender will reject the attacker's submission and the logging will return to step (1). Additionally, the two opponents should come to an agreement on the discrepancy and the remedy, and the attacker should re-log. Otherwise, the defender (in case of defeat or retreat) will be given the opportunity to pick up the military assets to which they are entitled.
    3. Attacker will confirm the defender's units used and lost; if any discrepancies are discovered, the attacker will reject the defender's submission and the logging will return to step (2). If the attacker was not victorious in the Sector Assault, they will be given the opportunity to pick up the remaining assets to which they are entitled (dropships are required on planet for this step). Finally, the attacker will submit the battle results and the sector will be unlocked (and if the attacker was victorious or the defender retreated, the sector ownership is transferred to the attacker).
    Forfeits: A forfeit of an entire Sector Assault will result in administrative logging of a victory for the opponent (not a retreat by the forfeiter). League administration will also determine if the forfeited combat units are destroyed, captured or retreated, depending on circumstances. On a single drop of an active Sector Assault, the forfeit will be logged by league administration in favor of the opponent as an 8-0 victory, at the current tonnage/BV, with full bonuses.
    Ties and Draws: For non-objective-based game modes, if not all combat units on either side of a drop have been destroyed, then the team that destroyed the most enemy tonnage or BV is declared the winner. At least 50% of the enemy tonnage must be destroyed in non-objective-based game modes in order to qualify for a win.
    In the event that both sides destroyed equivalent tonnage or BV, or not enough tonnage or BV was destroyed to qualify for a win, or an objective-based drop timed out without sufficient objectives met by either contestant, the drop is to be replayed with the same conditions (maps, game mode, environment, tonnage/BV, etc.). Combat units destroyed on the drop will remain destroyed; all others may be reused. Spawn points/lances/drop-zones may be changed and teams may choose different combat units than they used on the tied drop.
  10. Battle Procedures And Protocols
    In order to ensure the smooth operation of any NBT league, battle procedures and protocols have been established that all factions involved are expected to follow. Failure to do so, and to rectify to the satisfaction of both teams involved in executing a battle, and requiring admin involvement, will generally result in punitive actions such as forfeit or other adversarial actions on the part of league admin in favor of the plaintiff. Short version: follow the procedures and the rules, adhere to the time requirements for scheduling and logging battles, and everyone goes away happy.
    The details of launching a battle and preparing the battlefield are discussed elsewhere; this section details the events and requirements necessary actually to get opponents onto a server and actually fight the battle in the game or simulator used by the league.

    Before Drop Night

    These steps will take place before you ever meet on the game servers.
    Your command staff will receive a forces declaration ("forcedec") from the automation, stating all of the battle particulars, including battle ID, combat units on planet, opponent, maps to be used, environment settings, and so on. At the same time, you will see a new alert in your faction automation interface, notifying you of the forcedec issuance. You will schedule a date and time to fight the whole battle (in the case of Sector Raids) or to begin the battle (in the case of Sector Assaults) using the faction automation -- this is the official record of communication between the two factions, and will be the only source of communication considered when determining forfeits. All scheduling should be handled through the faction administration interface.
    • After a forcedec has been issued, the factions involved have 72 hours to complete arrangements to fight the battle.
    • Both teams are responsible for establishing contact and scheduling the battle; it is not incumbent upon the attacker, for example, to make initial contact -- the defender can just as easily open the lines of communication. A date and time should be agreed upon with 72 hours of issuance of the forcedec. Failure will result in the battle being forfeited by the delaying party. The sooner both parties respond, the sooner their schedules can be determined and the battles be fought.
    • All Sector Raids should be completed with 10 days of battle launch.
    • Sector Assaults MUST be started within 2 weeks of issuance of the forcedec. There will be NO EXCEPTIONS unless there are VERY extenuating circumstances.
    • When offering your availability to fight a battle, please state availability for the each of the following 7 days for the other team to choose from.
    Sector Assault Time Limits: Sector Assaults typically cannot be completed in a single night. However, a minimum time investment is expected for the parties involved in a Sector Assault. Please plan on at least 2 hours or 5 drops (whichever results in the greater number of drops completed in a night) when scheduling. Additionally, it may be easier for both teams to have a set night per week on which the assault can be fought until it is completed. It is expected that Sector Raids will be completed in a single night.
    Differing Time Zones: NBT Administration will do its best to prevent major timezone conflicts when populating factions with teams; this could mean setting up the map such that neighboring factions are controlled by teams in the same timezone, or by suggesting dual-ownership of a faction by teams from different geos, and so on. However, the schedules of two teams may still not match exactly (especially across geos, for instance a North American team against an Oceanic/Asia-Pacific team). In such cases, the "Give & Take" concept applies. The first week should be fought in the Defender's time frame, with the following week in the Attacker's time frame, alternating back and forth until the battle is completed. This does mean at the other team's time frame, not just an hour outside of ones own normal schedule. Standard US time is 2100-2200 (EST) on any night, and standard Euro time is 1500-1600 EST on the weekends. This concept may also apply when factions fight multiple series of raids over the course of the league.
    Another option is to involve allies to fulfill those alternate times that may be hard for your team to meet. Regardless of who is fighting a battle though, the give and take should continue throughout, and the initial agreed upon time should be stuck to each week or alt week. This is an area will it will require two teams to work together to get the battle accomplished. If you cannot work with the other team to complete a battle in this method, then you will need to look at merging with another unit, as you are not meeting the minimum requirements to maintain a faction within the league.
    While NBT Admin cannot require that teams follow certain procedures internally, we do require that the drop night go as smoothly as possible. This means preparing for your drop night in advance of the scheduled battle time. It's often just a matter of courtesy to your team and your opponent. Some common-sense suggestions include:
    • Practice and combat unit customization (i.e. "Mechlab") must be done PRIOR TO the scheduled time. In the lobby is not the time to be making new configs.
    • Inform your team of the agreed upon battle time, requesting their presence. We suggest that they show up at least 10 minutes early.
    • Games launch ON TIME. If your battle is scheduled at 9:00, then the game should begin at 9:00; players should not start arriving at 9:00.
    • You have time to prepare for your battle drops -- the forcedec is typically issued days in advance of the scheduled drop time; use that time to prepare your configs and your strategies and tactics. Know which players will be rotating in and out and which combat units they are likely to need, and their configs. Again, the time for that is long before you get into the game lobby.

    Pilot Requirements

    Each team should be able to provide the minimum number of pilots for each drop from their own rosters. We do understand though that occasionally things happen (real life mostly). As such, each team is allowed to make use of allied pilots to round out its drop team, with the following guidelines:
    • All allied factions may substitute no more than 2 pilots in any particular battle.
    • Factions with allied garrison present on planet may drop from 0% to 100%. Pilots playing on the allied garrison rule must use their own combat units, as long as they have 10 combat units remaining. After that, they become a normal allied unit (for purposes of pilot sharing).
    • General Rule (Offensive & Defensive) - max of 2 allied pilots per drop. Remaining pilots must be of the primary unit.
    • Exception - clans at alliance level greater than 25 may share up to 4 allied pilots per drop, regardless of allied garrison.
    • Mercenaries are never considered employers of one another for the purposes of allied pilots.
    • All of the above are rendered null and void if allied garrison or allied attack combat units are present in the battle. The allied units may then provide unlimited pilot so long as they have combat units left to pilot.
    • All pilots on an NBT roster must use their full in-game name, including any team or unit tags provided/managed by the game.
    Regardless of the sharing of pilots, these rules should not be abused in such a way to bring in "ringers" or similar. These rules are in place so that units may handle their battles in a timely manner, allowing both sides to get as much combat time as they wish, while enjoying the experience.

    Drop Time

    9:00 PM on Tuesday night is here, and it's drop time. Your team is assembled, everyone has their combat units configured and ready to go.
    NBT maintains its own Teamspeak 3 server, as well as a Discord channel. Between these two places, you should be able to find a neutral meeting ground with your opponent, where you have easy access to NBT admins for any questions you have or issues that need addressed. One or more representatives, with the authority to speak on behalf of your team, should be in one or both of these services prior to drop time (preferably at least 15 minutes early).
    The particular game or simulator used will depend on the NBT league in question; consult the league-specific rules for details.
    At least 5 minutes prior to drop time, a server or (private) lobby instance should be created for the drops, with the conditions as prescribed on the forcedec (or by the multi-drop tracker for multi-drop battles) for the first drop of the night. The defender will host the server or create the lobby instance, and when a choice is available, will take Team 1 or Team A (as applicable). In games where teams are organized instead by spawn point, the defender will have choice of spawn point, followed by the attacker. The teams should be assembled in the server, with spawn points chosen, and everyone "Ready", at the scheduled drop time. A 10-minute grace period is available for persistent connection issues, but should not be abused -- if the scheduled start is 9:00, this does not mean "it's really 9:10". If one team is having unforeseen issues with pilots or availability, they should communicate this to the opponent and both teams can determine the reasonable course of action (including a reschedule if necessary). If an insufficient number of pilots is available, 1 reschedule is allowed (no last-minute reschedules unless the opponent agrees). If an insufficient number of pilots shows up at the rescheduled time, the battle is forfeit. No-shows (with no communication) are automatically awarded to the opponent as forfeit, unless the opponent wishes to reschedule.

    Lobby/Server Issues

    Email NBT Administrators
    1. If there is a problem with the lobby, and there is no NBT Admin available, you may have a free reschedule.
    2. The time period to wait for an Admin response to emails to the above address is 30 minutes. After that time, you may call for the free reschedule.
    3. Individuals with admin access are listed as Operators in the NBT TS3 server. They are able to log into the admin automation and resolve league issues. Please follow their directions to ensure smooth battle nights for all.

    In-Game Rules

    Games or game clients behave differently from one another; for games or clients where there is a chance of disconnection on launch, NBT will be considered a "No Hot Drop" league, meaning that both teams must verify that all of their pilots are in the game and ready before anyone on either team moves from their spawn. For games or clients where connection to the lobby implies connection to the game, hot-drop will be allowed. For no-hot-drop games, each opposing drop commander must call "GO" in open/global text chat, at which time the teams may proceed with the drop.
    For no-hot-drop games, or for hot-drop games where disconnect on launch is possible, "GO" must be called within 2 minutes of game launch or the drop must be redone. Teams may choose different spawn points on the redrop, and may choose different combat units or configurations.
    Please make sure that all pilots are aware of the following rules as to conduct in the game itself:
    • Pilots may not use defects in the game, such as parts of terrain that "disappear" from a certain angle, to watch for the opposing team to approach -- this is akin to using a "wallhack" and is not tolerated.
    • Camping: Defined as "running off to hide, at any point in the drop, with no intention of fighting". This is different from, say, "taking up a defensive position with weapon choices to match", and NBT Admin knows the difference. We tire of hearing this accusation. In modern times, however, anyone can stream and virtually everyone has an easy way to record video of a match, and video evidence is king when it comes to camping accusations. You will find that NBT Admin will rarely decides in favor of the accuser in these cases.
    • All pilots will remain in the game until it is over. Some games will exhibit significant lag spikes or warping when a pilot disconnects.
    • Ping Problems: If a particular pilot has a consistent ping of over 1000, the other team may request for that pilot to be replaced. This does not apply to ping spikes. A consistent ping of 1000+ contributes to an unplayable environment for both sides.

    Post-Drop

    After the battle is finished, or between drops on a multi-drop night.
    • Once everyone has returned to the lobby, each team must notify the other which combat units were just taken. This is known as your "Drop Declaration" (dropdec). This dropdec must be 100% correct, under penalty of forfeit. Most games provide a post-match summary screen -- take a screenshot to be sure.
    • If further drops are planned for the night, both teams have 10 minutes to change out pilots, select combat units for the current drop, and ready up.
    • At this point, revert to the Drop-Time rules, and repeat.
    • If you are finished with all battles for the night, pilots may begin disconnecting from the lobby. Drop Commanders should stay online, in the NBT TS3 server or Discord channel, to confirm that the battles are reported in the automation immediately and correctly. Do not depend on your opponent to have taken screenshots that show the drop results (although it makes good sense to do so); remain around until the night's logging is completed on both sides (and attackers, please note that you have two steps in the logging process, where the defender only has one!).
    Remember: Battles must be reported as soon as they are completed. So it is necessary to have at least one member present for each battle that has automation access. The automation is set up to make reporting quick and easy. There is no excuse for delaying. Once completed with the battles and reporting, both Battle Commanders may disconnect and go their own way.
  11. Diplomacy, Alliances and Espionage
    While the mechanics of a resource-based planetary league can, on their own, provide additional meaning to the game being played, the interactions between the factions and the teams within the league are what provide the real depth in any NBT league. Otherwise, you may as well just be playing against the computer.
    In NBT, this interaction is enhanced by the formation (or dissolution) of alliances between factions, and ongoing diplomacy (and occasional underhandedness) between the factions in the league. While the basic details of alliances between factions are public knowledge, schemes, strategies and machinations are not -- and that is where any NBT league gains an added immersive dimension.

    Alliance Levels

    The level of diplomatic relations (or lack thereof) between factions is public knowledge, and is codified in a simple system: positive diplomacy levels indicate an alliance, and negative levels indicate hostility. A diplomacy level of zero (0) indicates neutrality and is where everyone in an NBT league begins. Greater magnitude of non-zero diplomacy levels indicate stronger alliances, or greater hostility, depending on whether the level is positive or negative, respectively.
    Since all factions start neutral with one another, it takes a nudge in one direction or the other to tip the relationship off the fence. Perhaps a faction requests safe passage through a system controlled by a neutrally-aligned neighbor; if the neighbor agrees, the relationship between the two begins to warm and the factions begin a positive diplomatic relationship with one another. Or perhaps that first faction decides they want to go take some of the neutral neighbor's resources; this will begin a decline in diplomatic relations.
    In either case, hostile actions will cause a negative effect on diplomatic relations, and friendly actions will cause a positive effect. In this way, factions can form their own alliances (or not), and it will require ongoing work on the part of the factions involved to nurture an alliance, or maintain a grievance. Two factions can also heal a broken diplomatic relationship by beginning to work together in ways that push their diplomacy level in a positive direction.
    Alliance levels do have a maximum (for allies) and minimum (for enemies); relations between two factions cannot continue growing or deteriorating forever. The maximum and minimum alliance levels between factions is set on a per-league basis and can be found in the per-league rules.
    Alliance levels are more than just a number; they also dictate in which ways two factions might interact in the league, enforced by the league automation. For instance, one faction may not purchase resources from another faction unless their alliance level is at or greater than a certain positive level. Or, one faction might not be able to launch a Sector Assault on another unless the level of diplomacy between the two is sufficiently poor. The levels at which certain acts are allowed is defined on a per-league basis and is documented in the rules for your particular league.

    Espionage And Counter-Intelligence

    As described on the page defining the rules for Sector Raids, one of the effects possible from a raid is spies ("espionage"), for attackers, and counter-intelligence for defenders.
    One of the central goals of the NBT economic and military environment is the notion of "scarcity": industry should be considered and invested carefully, and military campaigns should be executed wisely, and one way to ensure this is to make money and guns scarce -- wantonly spending ones military and economic might should result in adverse outcomes. But it is not possible to police this unilaterally, however, "on the honor system", as it were -- someone should be watching.
    One of the ways to keep factions honest, in terms of how they deploy their resources and prosecute their military campaigns, is if neighboring and enemy factions can keep track of what you are doing (at various levels of detail and accuracy, of course). For example, scarcity should dictate that it's not feasible to leave part of one's space essentially undefended, in order to put into motion an aggressive offensive campaign, but that only works if someone else knows that your space is undefended, and can take advantage of that. This is where professional spy networks enter the picture.
    In NBT, attacking factions will have the opportunity, as part of a Sector Raid, to place spies in an enemy sector. These spies can detect and report on economic activity (industrial investment, for example) in the sector, on troop movements and garrison levels in the sector, on political events in the sector, and so on. Depending on the "experience" level of the spy, and the area(s) they are monitoring, the sponsoring faction can gain a wealth of ongoing intel on the enemy's activities, and plan accordingly (or, distribute the intel to allies, or to neutral factions as part of opening friendly diplomatic relations).
    But one should not assume that the target faction is simply letting this happen; factions are also able to spend resources on counter-intelligence, either as part of effect credits earned during a Sector Raid defense, or as part of ongoing counter-espionage efforts funded by their income. These efforts have the effect of reducing the effectiveness and accuracy of your spies; in some cases, your spies may receive and pass on incorrect information, and you will need to spend time and effort correlating their intel to identify the truth. In extreme cases, counter-espionage efforts can root out and destroy your spies entirely, leaving you completely in the dark about enemy actions within a sector.

    Spy Areas Of Focus

    Each spy placed will focus on a single general area to monitor and report -- economic, military or political. They will not report on activity outside their area of focus. This area is set when the spy is placed and cannot subsequently be changed.

    Spy Skill Levels

    Each spy has a skill level, on a scale of 1-5. This level is determined when the spy is placed in the enemy space (during the Sector Raid), and cannot subsequently increase. Each skill level corresponds to a different level of efficiency and accuracy:
    1. Level 1: 35% chance of detecting activity in their area of focus; 50% quantitative error in their reports.
    2. Level 2: 50% chance of detecting activity in their area of focus; 25% quantitative error in their reports.
    3. Level 3: 70% chance of detecting activity in their area of focus; 25% quantitative error in their reports.
    4. Level 4: 90% chance of detecting activity in their area of focus; 10% quantitative error in their reports.
    5. Level 5: 100% chance of detecting activity in their area of focus; 0% quantitative error in their reports.
    Consult the Sector Raids rules for more on how a spy's skill level is set.

    Spies And Counter-Espionage

    The defending faction in a Sector Raid has the opportunity to offset the skill of any spies placed during a Sector Raid; for details, consult the Sector Raids rules. In general, this offset reduces the skill level of spies placed (if any), at that time only.
    Additionally, a faction may spend c-bills on counter-intelligence efforts, on an ongoing basis. This will have the effect, over time, of reducing a spy's skill level. This spending affects all spies in a faction's sector at once, so the more spies in the sector, the less the reduction effect per c-bill spent. The exact amount of spending required to reduce a spy's skill by one full level is determined on a per-league basis, and the rules for that league should be consulted for those amounts.
    If a spy's skill level is reduced to zero (0), the spy is considered destroyed (or, at least, discovered and ejected from the sector); either way, that spy no longer is present in the sector and cannot make any reports from the sector thereafter.
  12. NBT-MWO-Specific Rules

    NBT-MWO

    The following rules are specific to the NBT-MWO league.
    • NBT-MWO is a tonnage-based (not BV-based) league.
    • NBT-MWO drop tonnages are chosen at random in 50-ton increments, from the following ranges. The probability function is not 1.0; in other words, the randomness is "weighted" and the weighting can change at any time without notice. Notice will only be given if/when the ranges themselves change.
      • Sector Raids: 350-500 tons
      • Sector Assault (Assault Phase): 300-600 tons
      • Sector Assault (Siege Phase): 400-600 tons
    • NBT-MWO will use all games modes from the Mechwarrior:Online game except for Escort. Assault and Incursion are only used during the Siege phase of Sector Assaults. Skirmish, Domination and Conquest will be used for the remaining types of drops throughout the league. All modes are chosen randomly (not necessarily an equal distribution) by the automation. On Assault and Incursion mode drops, the defender will forfeit the drop if they "capture" the attacker's base; consider the attacker base as "off-limits" for defenders. The symmetric objective modes (Conquest and Domination) are played as normal, with no restrictions.
      • Incursion Note: Incursion requires that one base be damaged more than the other. If the defender destroys all attacker mechs, they are required to damage the attacker base in order to end the drop. If the defender destroys all attacker mechs but is so damaged itself that damaging the attacker base will result in the destruction of the last defender units (and a "win" for the attackers), the automation will provide a means of logging this situation. (Note: the Incursion mode will not be enabled until the automation has this support).

    Time

    The following time limits are in effect for NBT-MWO
    • Battle Lockdown: 18 hours from battle launch

    Cost Schedules

    The costs for combat unit purchases are listed on the factory purchase pages in the automation. Costs will fluctuate dynamically with supply and demand.

    Base Maintenance costs for NBT-MWO1

    Item C-bills Rate Description
    Planet 10,000,000 per planet Monthly maintenance charge for each planet owned by the faction
    Charge Station 75,000,000 per station Monthly maintenance charge for each charge station owned by the faction
    Factory 25,000,000 per factory Monthly maintenance charge for each factory owned by the faction
    Jumpship 100 per ton Monthly maintenance charge for each jumpship owned by the faction
    Dropship 75 per ton Monthly maintenance charge for each dropship owned by the faction
    Light/Med 'Mech
    GarrisonAttackMothball
    250,0001,250,000750,000
    per 'Mech Monthly maintenance charge for each light or medium 'Mech owned by the faction
    Heavy 'Mech
    GarrisonAttackMothball
    312,5001,562,500937,500
    per 'Mech Monthly maintenance charge for each heavy 'Mech owned by the faction
    Assault 'Mech
    GarrisonAttackMothball
    375,0001,875,0001,125,000
    per 'Mech Monthly maintenance charge for each assault 'Mech owned by the faction
    1NBT-MWO Administration reserves the right to adjust the maintenance costs across the board for all factions, at the faction class level, at any time, without notice. "Faction class" refers to the type of faction (Clan, House, Periph, Merc, etc.).

    Jump Costs For NBT-MWO

    NBT-MWO jump costs are linearly dependant on the mass of the jumpship in tons. The per-ton jump costs are:
    Type IS Clan
    Normal (Attack and Pass-Through) 2 1.1
    Clan Homeworld N/A 350
    Merc Contract 350 N/A
    Periphery Link 350 N/A
    There is no additional cost for charge-station-assisted jumps.

    Industry Upgrades

    Factions may upgrade the industry on the planets in their space at a cost of between 5 and 13 c-bills per c-bill of industry purchased. This factor will change daily and is chosen randomly. The random distribution for industry purchases, like those for tonnage distributions, is not evenly distributed and may change at the discretion of NBT Administration, without notice or warning. Notice will only be given when/if the range of the industry purchase factors change.